Electric Bike Laws by State

 

Knowing the rules of the road as a biker is important—but equally as crucial is understanding the electric bike laws by state. Of course you don’t need to memorize all 50 of these rules and regulations, but keep this lengthy guide handy if you’re a new Bluejay e-bike owner and need to get comfortable with the regulations in your home state with your speedy new wheels. Or, if you plan to take your Bluejay Sport on an interstate cycling trip and want to know if your bike needs to be registered or not (spoiler: If you’re heading to Hawaii, that’ll be a yes). 


And, unless otherwise specified, the types of e-bike classes defined by each state are as follows:


Class 1: The bike’s motor only provides assistance when the rider is pedaling. The max speed is 20 MPH.

Class 2: The motor contains a throttle, which is used exclusively to propel the bike forward. The max speed is 20 MPH.

Class 3: The bike’s motor provides assistance when the rider is pedaling. The max speed is 28 MPH and these bikes are equipped with a speedometer.


Also, it’s worth noting that some of these rules and regulations will differ based on the county, town or city you’re in, so be sure to check local legislation before heading out for your first flight. Now, without further ado, here’s your guide to electric bike laws, organized by state.

 

Electric Bike Laws by State


ALABAMA

In Alabama, E–bikes are regulated just like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike and multi-use paths but local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.


Alabama designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • All riders and operators of this bike must wear a helmet.

ALASKA

In Alaska, E-bikes are considered a “motor-driven cycle,” which means they are not subject to the same road rules as traditional bikes. E-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks or bike paths. There is a 14 year old age minimum for e-bike use. 


E-bike riders are required to carry an operator’s license, but the bikes themselves are not subject to registration or insurance. 


Helmets are not required for e-bike riding. 

 

ARIZONA

In Arizona, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths and sidewalks. There is no age minimum for use.

 

Arizona designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

Helmets are not required for e-bike riding. 

 

ARKANSAS

In Arkansas, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike and multi-use paths but local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Arkansas designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike.
    • Helmets are required for riders of Class 3 e-bikes that are under 21 years.
    • There are certain access restrictions for Class 3 e-bike riders.

 

woman riding an e bike. electric bike laws by state

CALIFORNIA

In California, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike and multi-use paths but local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

California designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Helmets are required for riders of Class 3 e-bikes.
    • There are certain access restrictions for Class 3 e-bike riders.


COLORADO

In Colorado, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike and multi-use paths but local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Colorado designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike.
    • Helmets are required for riders of Class 3 e-bikes that are under 21 years.
    • There are certain access restrictions for Class 3 e-bike riders.

 

CONNECTICUT

In Connecticut, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Local authorities may restrict the use of e-bikes under motor power on bike paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Connecticut designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Helmets are required for riders of all Class 3 e-bikes.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on bike trails and paths, or multi-use trails and paths.

 

DELAWARE

In Delaware, an e-bike is considered a bicycle when the motor is under 750w, has a max speed of 20 MPH and features operable pedals. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks and bike paths. 

 

Helmets are required for riders and passengers of e-bikes under 18 years. There is no minimum age for e-bike riding.

 

FLORIDA

In Florida, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Any class of e-bike can be ridden wherever traditional bikes are allowed, including bike lanes and multi-use paths. Local authorities may restrict the use of e-bikes under motor power on bike paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Florida designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

All e-bike operators and passengers under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet.

 

GEORGIA

In Georgia, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Local authorities may restrict the use of e-bikes under motor power on bike paths, so be sure to check local rules and regulations.

 

Georgia designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 15 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on a bike path or shared use path, unless said path is within or adjacent to a highway or roadway. Or if they are specifically allowed by local authority or state agency with jurisdiction. 
    • Helmets must be worn by anyone who operates or rides as a passenger on a Class 3 e-bike.

 

HAWAII

In Hawaii, an e-bike is considered a “low-speed electric bicycle” whose assisted max speed on a paved surface while powered, is less than 20 MPH. E-bikes are allowed everywhere a bike is allowed, including bike paths.

 

E-bike owners are required to be registered and pay a $30 fee at any city hall satellite location or the state registration unit. Owners must be at least 18 years old. Persons 15 years and older may operate an e-bike if it is registered to a household member. 

 

Helmets are required for any e-bike rider under the age of 16.

 

IDAHO

In Idaho, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths, however local authorities may restrict the use of them on bike paths, so be sure to check local rules and regulations.

 

The use of e-bikes on singletrack mountain bike trails is determined by the local agency or local authority with jurisdiction over that land. Check with local land managers for information about access.

 

Idaho designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

woman riding an electric bike

 

ILLINOIS

In Illinois, an e-bike is considered a “low-speed electric bicycle” and the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes may not be ridden on sidewalks but are allowed on bike paths, however local authorities may restrict the use of them on bike paths, so be sure to check town, city or country rules and regulations.

 

Illinois designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Persons under 16 years of age may not ride a class 3 e-bike.

 

INDIANA

In Indiana, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Local authorities may restrict the use of e-bikes on bike paths, so be sure to check local rules and regulations.

 

Indiana designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 15 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on a trail, bike path or multipurpose path, unless said path is within or adjacent to a highway or roadway. Or if they are specifically allowed by local authority or state agency with jurisdiction. 
    • Helmets must be worn by any person who operates or rides as a passenger on a Class 3 e-bike and is under 18 years.

 

IOWA

In Iowa, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike or multi-use paths, however local authorities may restrict the use of them on bike paths, so be sure to check town, city or country rules and regulations.

 

Iowa designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Operators of Class 3 e-bikes on bike or multi-use paths must not exceed the posted speed limit. If there is no posted speed limit, the max is 20 MPH. 

 

KANSAS

In Kansas, e-bikes are regulated like traditional bikes, which means the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insuring. E-bikes are allowed on bike or multi-use paths, however local authorities may restrict the use of them on bike paths, so be sure to check town, city or country rules and regulations.

 

Kansas designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.

 

KENTUCKY

In Kentucky, en e-bike is defined as a “bicycle” so long as the e-bike has operable pedals and can be operated under combined human and motor power. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks and bike paths.

 

Helmets are not required to ride an e-bike. There is no minimum age for e-bike use. 

 

LOUISIANA

In Louisiana, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance.

 

Louisiana designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

MAINE

In Maine, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Municipalities, local authorities or governing bodies of a public agency that has jurisdiction can restrict where e-bikes are allowed. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Maine designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on a bike path, unless said path is within or adjacent to a highway or roadway. Or if they are specifically allowed by local authority or state agency with jurisdiction. 

 

Helmets are required for riders or passengers under 16 years of age. A person under 16 years old may not operate a Class 2 or Class 3 e-bike unless it is designed to accommodate passengers.

 

MARYLAND

In Maryland, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks unless expressly allowed. Local or state authorities can restrict where e-bikes are allowed. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt. 

 

Maryland designated three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on a bike path, unless said path is within or adjacent to a highway or right-of-way. Or if they are specifically allowed by local authority or state agency with jurisdiction

 

MASSACHUSETTS

In Massachusetts, an e-bike is defined as a “motorized bicycle” as long as its max speed is 25 MPH. As motorized bicycles, e-bikes are not subject to the same rules of the road as regular bikes. E-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks or bike paths.

 

E-bike riders must carry an operator’s license and are subject to registration requirements. E-bikes are not subject to insurance requirements. 

 

Helmets are required and there is a 16 year age minimum for e-bike usage. 

 

MICHIGAN

In Michigan, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. 

 

Michigan designated three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 14 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Helmets are required for riders of Class 3 e-bikes for under 18 years.

 

Class 1 e-bikes are allowed on bike paths and linear trails but Class 2 or Class 3 e-bikes are not, unless authorized by a local agency. Check with town, city or county for local rules and regulations.

 

person on an e bike

 

 

MINNESOTA

In Minnesota, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. All classes of e-bikes are allowed on bike paths or shared use paths where traditional bikes are permitted. Local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

No person under 15 years may operate an electric bike. 

 

Minnesota designated three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

MISSISSIPPI

In Mississippi, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths or multi-use paths but local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Mississippi designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.

 

MISSOURI

In Missouri, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. All classes of e-bikes are allowed on bike paths or shared use paths where traditional bikes are permitted. Local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Missouri designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.

 

MONTANA

In Montana, an e-bike is defined as an “electrically assisted bicycle” as long as its max speed is 20 MPH. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks and bike paths.

 

Helmets are not required for e-bike riding and there is no minimum age for e-bike use.

 

NEBRASKA

In Nebraska, an e-bike is defined as an “electric assisted bicycle” as long as its motor is under 750w, it has a max speed of 20 MPH and it has fully operable pedals. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks and bike paths.

 

Helmets are not required for e-bike riding and there is no minimum age for e-bike use.

 

NEVADA

In Nevada, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. All classes of e-bikes may be ridden in places where bicycles are allowed, including streets, highways, roads, roadways, bicycle lanes, bike paths and shared-use paths. Local authorities may restrict riding on certain bike paths or share-use paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Nevada designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

In New Hampshire, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Local authorities may restrict riding on certain bike paths or share-use paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

New Hampshire designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • You must be 16 years or older to ride a Class 3 e-bike, unless the e-bike is designed to accommodate passengers
    • Helmets are required for riders or passengers of Class 3 e-bikes under the age of 18.

 

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey designates two classes of low-speed electric bikes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2

 

In New Jersey, a Class 1 and 2 e-bike is regulated like a bicycle, so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Class 1 or 2 e-bikes may ride on bike paths. Bikes cannot be operated on a sidewalk intended for pedestrian use, except if expressly allowed. Local authorities may restrict riding on certain bike paths or share-use paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

New Jersey classifies Class 3 e-bikes as motorized bicycles. A motorized bicycle is not subject to the same rules of the road as traditional bikes. Motorized bicycle riders must carry an operator’s license and are subject to registration and insurance requirements. There is a 15 years of age minimum for motorized bicycle use. 

 

NEW MEXICO

In New Mexico, e-bikes are defined as “mopeds.” As mopeds, e-bikes are not subject to all of the same rules of the road as bicycles. As mopeds, e-bikes are subject to licensing and insurance requirements that apply to motor vehicles. There is a 15 years of age minimum for e-bikes. E-bikes are not allowed on the sidewalk. Local authorities may restrict riding on bike paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

NEW YORK

In New York, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Cities and towns have extensive local authority, including the ability to prohibit e-bikes or require helmets and reflective clothing.

 

New York designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • The industry-defined Class 3 e-bikes are not defined or permitted to operate in New York. Instead, the max speed of this Class of e-bike is set at 25 MPH.

 

Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes have access on roads with speed limits of 30 MPH or less, including bike lanes. They also have access on some bike paths that are connected or adjacent to roads. Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes may carry passengers and must ride single file.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

In North Carolina, an e-bike is defined as an “electric assisted bicycle” as long as its motor is under 750w, it has a max speed of 20 MPH and it has fully operable pedals. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks if bicycles are allowed. State law does not specifically address if e-bikes are allowed on bike paths, so check local authorities or agencies for more information.

 

Helmets are not required. The minimum age for e-bike use is 16 years of age.

 

NORTH DAKOTA

In North Dakota, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths and multi-use paths. However, local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

North Dakota designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • A person under 18 years of age cannot operate a Class 3 e-bike, unless they are wearing a helmet.

 

OHIO

In Ohio, an e-bike is classified as an “electric bicycle.” The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths and multi-use paths. However, local authorities may restrict riding on certain paths, so be sure to check town, city and county rules and regulations.

 

Ohio designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Riders and passengers of Class 3 e-bikes are required to wear a helmet.

 

The use of e-bikes on single track mountain bike trails is determined by the local agency or local authority with jurisdiction over that land. Check with local land managers for information about access.

 

OKLAHOMA

In Oklahoma, an e-bike is regulated like a bicycle so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Local authorities or state agencies with jurisdiction can restrict the use of e-bikes. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Oklahoma designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on a trail, bike path or multipurpose path, unless said path is within or adjacent to a highway or roadway. Or if they are specifically allowed by local authority or state agency with jurisdiction. 

 

OREGON

In Oregon, an e-bike is defined as an “electric assisted bicycle” and are regulated as bicycles as long as its motor has a max output of 1,000w, it has pedals that propel the bike with human power and doesn’t exceed 20 MPH. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths but are not allowed on sidewalks. The age minimum for e-bike riders is 16 years of age.

 

E-bike riders are not required to wear a helmet.

 

PENNSYLVANIA

In Pennsylvania, an e-bike is defined as “pedalcycles with electric assist” as long as its motor is under 750w, it has a max speed of 20 MPH on a level surface when powered by the motor source only, weighs no more than 100 lbs and it has fully operable pedals. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks and bike paths. No person under 16 years of age may operate an e-bike. E-bikes are allowed wherever bicycles or “pedalcycles” are allowed. E-bikes are allowed on sidewalks but restrictions may apply. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

E-bike riders are not required to wear a helmet.

 

RHODE ISLAND

In Rhode Island, an e-bike is defined as an “electric motorized bicycle,” considered to be vehicles with a power output no greater than 1,491w, a max speed of 25 MPH and fully operable pedals. E-bikes are not subject to the laws that apply to motor vehicles. E-bikes are not required to be registered. E-bikes are subject to the rules of the road that apply to “vehicles.” State laws do not specifically address if e-bikes are allowed on bike paths, so check local authorities or agencies for more information.

 

Man riding Bluejay bike

SOUTH CAROLINA

In South Carolina, e-bikes lack a specific classification under current laws. However, “e-bikes” are “vehicles” and are therefore subject to the requirements for “vehicles.” E-bikes equipped with motors that have a power output of less than 750w are specifically exempt from the definition of “mopeds.” Therefore, e-bikes are not subject to requirements that apply to “mopeds,” such as licensing and registration. E-bikes are subject to the same rules of the road that apply to vehicles. Consult your local authority for more information about e-bike regulation in your jurisdiction, including whether they are allowed on bicycle paths.

 

SOUTH DAKOTA

In South Dakota, e-bikes are classified as electric bicycles. The same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance.

 

South Dakota designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.
    •  Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on a bike trail or path or multi-use trail or path, but are allowed on the road. 

 

Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes are allowed on any bike path or multi-use path.

 

TENNESSEE

In Tennessee, e-bikes are classified as “electric bicycles.” The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks.

 

Tennessee designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 14 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike.
    • Riders and passengers of Class 3 e-bikes are required to wear helmets.
    • Class 3 e-bikes have limited use of bike paths and are generally not permitted.

 

Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes are allowed on bike paths. However, local governments have the authority to restrict the use of Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes on bike paths. Consult your local authority for more information about e-bike regulation in your jurisdiction.



TEXAS

In Texas, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are not allowed on sidewalks. The local authority with jurisdiction can implement certain restrictions, such dedicated mountain bike trails. E-bikes may not be restricted in places where bicycles are allowed to operate. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Texas designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • You must be 15 years of age or older to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger if the e-bike is designed to carry more than one person.

 

UTAH

In Utah, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike paths but not on sidewalks. 

 

Utah designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

VERMONT

In Vermont, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes are allowed on bike or multi-use paths. However, local governments have the authority to restrict the use of e-bikes on certain paths. Check your town, city or county for local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Vermont designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.

 

VIRGINIA

In Virginia, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. E-bikes may be ridden on bike lanes and multi-use paths where bikes are permitted. However, local governments have the authority to restrict the use of e-bikes on certain paths. Check your town, city or county for local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Virginia designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • You must be 14 years of age or older to operate a Class 3 e-bike.
    • All operators and passengers of Class 3 e-bikes must wear a helmet.

 

WASHINGTON

In Washington, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. 

 

Washington designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Anyone under 16 is not permitted to operate a Class 3 e-bike, but they are cleared to ride as a passenger.

 

Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes are allowed on bike paths and improved trails; while Class 3 e-bikes are not unless the local agency authorizes them. Check your town, city or county for local rules and regulations when in doubt. The use of e-bikes on singletrack mountain bike trails is determined by the local agency or local authority with jurisdiction over that land. Check with local land managers for information about access.

 

WASHINGTON D.C.

In Washington D.C., an e-bike is defined as a“motorized bicycle” so long as the e-bike has operable pedals, can be operated under combined human and motor power and has a max speed of 20 MPH. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. You must be 16 years or older to operate an e-bike.

WEST VIRGINIA

In West Virginia, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles so the same road rules apply to both. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. City, town or state agencies can restrict where e-bikes are allowed. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

West Virginia designates two e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
    • Class 1 e-bikes are allowed on bike paths, multi-use trails and single-use trails
  • Class 3
    • You must be 16 years or older to operate a Class 3 e-bike. 
    • Passengers on Class 3 e-bikes under 15 years of age must be driven by someone 18 years of age or older.

 

All operators and passengers under 15 years of age must wear a helmet.

 

WISCONSIN

In Wisconsin, e-bikes are regulated like bicycles. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. Local governments have the authority to restrict the use of e-bikes under motor power on bike paths. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

Wisconsin designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
    • Persons under the age of 16 may not operate a Class 3 e-bike.

 

WYOMING

In Wyoming, e-bikes are classified as “electric bicycles”. The same road rules apply to both e-bikes and traditional bikes. E-bikes aren’t subject to any sort of registration, licensing or insurance. 

 

Wyoming designates three e-bike classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3

 

All classes of e-bikes are allowed on bike paths. However, local governments have the authority to restrict the use of e-bikes under motor power on bike paths. Check local rules and regulations when in doubt.

 

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