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The Best Warm Weather Winter Bike Trails Across the US

 

Some of us simply are not snow people—and that’s totally OK. Because not all winter sports require braving snow, ice and freezing temps for a seriously memorable time. Which is why we wanted to remind you of these six warm weather biking destinations across the US that will give you a wintertime adrenaline rush, without having to rent skis or a snowboard. All of the below locations are open to e-bikes, though some of them—like the National Trail in Phoenix, Arizona and Snow Canyon State Park in Hurricane, Utah—will be best explored on a mountain bike, like our new Bluejay Sport. So, charge up those battery packs, start prepping a picnic lunch, fill up those water bottles and grab your helmet, you’ve got some trails to discover. 

Beaufort, SC: Spanish Moss Trail

This trail is located halfway between Savannah, GA and Chrleston, SC, two cities that have become stellar biking destinations thanks to year round warm climates and relatively flat terrain. Running between Port Royal and Yemassee, the paved Spanish Moss Trail has lots to see along the way. It runs on the historic Magnolia Line Railroad, which was active from 1870 to 2003, and traverses marshes, wetlands and gorgeous neighborhoods. While this loop is 10.2 miles, and might not be amenable to younger kids or newer bikers, there are plenty of other local trails and loops that still have those “gotta stop to take a picture” moments.

Phoenix, AZ: National Trail

While you might have to brave three-digit temps during the summer in Phoenix, the more temperate winter weather makes this desert city ideal for all-day adventuring from December to March. And the National Trail has been called the best biking spot in the city for a handful of reasons. There are a number of different trails to explore, offering a wide variety of terrain and difficulty, and if you’re riding your Bluejay e-bike, your battery pack will allow you to explore every last corner. Check out the three mile trail on the easternmost part of Pima Canyon for a shorter trek or attempt the 12.5 mile trail on South Mountain (but be prepared for steep drops and some serious rocks). 

Everglades City, FL: Everglades National Park

These iconic wetlands span a whopping 1.5 million acres and include five biking trails (all of which are open to e-bikers, with a max speed of 10 MPH). This is the biking trip to take if you’re after serious mileage and even more serious wildlife spotting. From birds and turtles to snakes and even alligators—plus untouched nature as far as the eye can see—this trek will be seriously adventurous. As such, you can expect that most of the trails will be grass or dirt. For an easier excursion, hit the 5.2 mile loop at the Rowdy Bend Trail or head out for a longer 15-mile trip on Shark Valley Tram Road, which leads you to the Shark Valley Observation tower, the highest point reachable by foot within the Everglades National Park. Yeah, you will not want to forget your camera on this trip. 

Hawai’i, HI: Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Here’s a reminder that not all tropical vacations need to include lounging on the beach while sipping a frozen drink (well, at least not every day!). The Big Island is the most bike-friendly in the state and the Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park is ideal for exploring on two wheels—plus, you can ride your e-bike at any part of the park that’s open to bikes. You can take a quick 1 to 2 hour spin around the rim of the volcano on partly paved paths, tackle an arduous road through rainforest and  lava flow on the Escape to Mauna Ulu path or chase breathtaking views at the Overlook Hilina Pali, where cars tend to be scarce. Keep in mind that the park is really strict about visitors staying on marked paths, to protect the rare plants, incredible lava formations and archaeological sites, so this is not the kind of place where you’ll want to be caught exploring off-trail. 

Hurricane, UT: Snow Canyon State Park

Mountain bikers should be sure to put this Southwestern Utah town on their “must-visit” list. What’s so special about it? Well, it’s one of the rare places where you can see red canyons and far off snow dusted mountains, all at the same time. This corner of the US is where the Mojave Desert, the Colorado Plateau and the Great Basin meet, which explains why the geological features are so diverse. Once you’re in Hurricane, UT, a visit to Snow Canyon State Park is a must. It boasts a ton of different trails and terrain and there’s even a campsite, for the super adventurous. While you can certainly bike in this part of Utah any month of the year, the “shoulder” winter months are when the temps will be most comfortable, between mid 50s and 60s, so consider booking from October to November or March through May. 

San Diego, CA: The Bayshore Bikeway

This particular bike excursion will begin with a ride on a ferry for a quick trip across San Diego Bay, placing you and your two wheels at the Coronado Ferry Landing. From there, you’ll soak up ocean and city vistas, plenty of palm trees and a healthy dose of California sunlight on this mostly flat 24-mile loop. A combination of paved paths and bike lanes in street traffic, this trail is perfect if you like your e-biking with a side of sightseeing. As you travel through the towns of Chula Vista, Imperial Beach and Downtown San Diego, you’ll pass marinas, parks and even the Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge. San Diego itself is a really bike friendly city and there are lots of rail trails to explore, so you can alternate between nature rides and city rides as you please.